Slumping / Back Problems

Discussion in 'General Offtopic' started by Roboartist, Jun 13, 2018.

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  1. Roboartist

    Roboartist Reclaimer

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    I slump WAY too much. It’s a habit I have a hard time shaking off because I forget I’m trying to sit up straight when I’m in front of the computer. I’ve starting slumping since early highschool pretty consistently throughout my need to game a shit ton. It’s gotten to the point where my back is that of a 40+ yo man, and I’m 22. Wouldn’t doubt if I’ve formed some sort of scoliosis. Also constant slumping has led to occasional / mild stomachs pains.

    Any tips? I’ve heard working out is one of em.
     
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  2. Light

    Light R2 paladin

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    Get a standing desk
    Or just stop going online (obviously a joke)
    And yeah strengthening your back does give you a better posture because it holds you up (I seen a personal difference since I stop doing full body and started splitting giving me a day to focus on all parts of my back)

    But you don’t need to do any of that you just need to stretch and have better awareness
    You can find lots of videos on how to stretch to get rid of a slumped back
    Also do some sort of yoga (not stretching) real yoga were you bring awareness into your body, kind of like meditating, if you have he awareness of your body slumping the it won’t be a problem. Periodically get up from your chair and stretch

    Also I thought title of thread was slumping Black problems
     
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  3. Purj

    Purj The Last Alliance Twink

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    You probably have kyphosis. Welcome to the club (a whole generation of people who sit with terrible posture and look down at their phones), I've had it since 13 years old.

    Good news is, its pretty easy to manage. Get in the habit of sitting and standing properly. Sit/stand tall but not so much that you are sticking our your chest just to appear as tall as possible. Keep your monitor at eye level when you're sitting up straight. Stretch your back, shoulders, neck and hamstrings. The whole thing is a system and tight hamstrings can pull on your lower back. I typically do this in the shower or while watching a stream or some shit. Dont leave out working your back at the gym to strengthen the muscles that support your back/posture.
     
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  4. Sun

    Sun Coordinator 30-39 Coordinator

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    Just went through physical therapy for something similar. You need to keep your core strengthen and your body flexible. It's just sitting in general. As for a stretch to help you....

    First lay on a heat pad for 10-15 mins to warm your lower back. Take a tower fold in half and roll it tight. Put the towel in the natural curve of your lower back once it is warmed up. Your feet play a big part in this stretch keep your big toes touching. Arms stretch above your head with palms on the floor. This causes your spine to curve the lower back and the towel helps to stretch it properly. About 5 mins to start it can be intense so be easy at first.
    --- Double Post Merged, Jun 13, 2018, Original Post Date: Jun 13, 2018 ---
    Oh if you want to stretch center of back yoga pose called thread the needle.
     
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  5. Sketchbag

    Sketchbag OVOXO Head Moderator

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    My backs hurting right now ugh...
     
  6. Bestworld

    Bestworld MBA

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    I've been gaming for all my life (got my first PC at 3 years old, a few consoles after etc.). I almost never sit straight, but I also have a strong back, so I haven't had any issues. What I'm getting at, is that you should build some muscle to support your back. I don't think the solution is retro-active though, depending on the severity of your back problems. However, it's definitely worth a shot.

    What seems to be the most fragile imo, is the neck. I hear a ton of people who work in front of a computer complain about neck issues (especially before the time of employers focusing ergonomics). I work at a desk that I can adjust to any sitting / standing position (I never stand tho, lul). It seems way harder to build a "strong" neck in that sense, as opposed to building a strong back. So look out for your neck too amigo.
     
  7. Sponsor

    Sponsor NaCl Moderator

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    Strengthen core/back

    Be mindful about your posture and keep your shoulders back

    DON'T go see a chiropractor

    Health > gaming. so maybe something to consider...
     
  8. necroaqua

    necroaqua Member

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    Recently had a rotated disc. Shit sucks. If you're feeling any pain that doesn't go away after a week, schedule an appt with your dr. If you have any muscle weakness or loss of feeling in your extremities, go see your dr TODAY.

    Go see a physical therapist for a few weeks to learn some good stretches/exercises and then stop (if you can afford to). Otherwise youtube and the internet is your budget alternative.

    Get a cylindrical back pillow from amazon or wherever. Put them on your chair where it feels comfortable on your lower back. The curve of the pillow helps you keep that curve in your lower spine, as well as forcing you to sit up straight. If you have a long commute, consider getting something for your car. And maybe one for work.

    If you sleep on your side, put a second pillow between your legs.

    Make sure your monitor is level with your head. Use old textbooks or buy something to raise your monitor so you aren't looking down at it.

    Standing desks are good, but transition desks are better. Especially if you have a desk job and can get work to pay for it. Standing all day isn't great either - ideally you want to alternate sitting/standing throughout the day.

    And finally, core exercises help keep pressure off your spine. You can find a bunch of simple/stretches online, but I'd try and find a few ones that are easy to do at home and make a habit of doing them every day. Doing 30 crunches a day can help.
     
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  9. Infomerc

    Infomerc Grandfathered

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    1. Go higher up with the monitor. (Say 10-15 degrees). If you have a computer desk with a shelf slightly above head level, put your monitor there. I also sit on a cushion on the floor, and HDMI into a large-screen TV on the wall. I never have neck problems with this.

    2. Be semi-reclined. (Too far back and your head still won't be in a neutral position). Keep back support only for lower to mid back. Nothing that could hit the top of your back, say between the shoulders. When sitting on the floor my back hits the couch lower/mid-back and gives it its more natural curvature. I've also used the large distilled water bottles (the 18-liter jobs; think water-cooler), the radius, curvature and firmness of that cylinder are just about perfect (I put a towel for cushion though). I tried a soccerball and a small medicine/slam ball; didn't work. Basketball might.

    3. Keep the keyboard and mouse close to your chest and about chest high. The first keeps the torque from your cantilevered arms to a minimum. You should look like a praying mantis. This is the most natural position. Proofs: 1. IIRC this started with an MIT study on keyboards & RSI. 2. For 10-15 years, Microsoft has followed that lead with their ergonomic keyboards (one of the few things they're smart about). The feet pop out from the front and the keyboard tilts away from you. 3. My own proof is simpler: look at photos of sleeping astronauts. The most neutral position is the praying mantis pose. Minimum tension.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2018
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  10. Psilocybine

    Psilocybine Veteran

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    Want to know my secret to not slumping.... ..attitude/mood. Ever heard ppl talk about smiling to get in a better mood....same thing stand up straight, make eye contact and watch how things change.
     
  11. Light

    Light R2 paladin

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    Smiling gives you a false sense of happiness
    Positive thinking is joke
    It’s a good movement and it’s pointing to the right place but ultimately you cant fake till you make it, it’s the worst main stream advice
    You have to deal with the negative first accept at as it and let it go
    Not wallow in it but feel it, only embodiment can help you fully experience a feeling thought or intention
    I see a lot of people being fake smiling trying to be positive and they have all the negative emotions and thoughts suppressed

    When people think positive they do it wrong and suppress and deny
    You have accept and let go, that’s when you make room for the positivity
     
  12. Psilocybine

    Psilocybine Veteran

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    Sounds good and all.....but that wasnt my point.

    You get back what you put into the world aka Karma.

    You dont smile to become happy, you smile to be approachable so life can present you with a chance to be happy.

    You use proper posture so you appear more confident and in turn, things will start happening that make you feel more confident.
     
  13. Kirise

    Kirise Member

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    My brother started working out with a balanced program about 9 months ago, after three decades of bad posture. He resolved 70% of his postural issues in 9 months, no joke. I had fewer postural issues than he did, and 7 months of working out (inspired by him) resolved most of those.

    Point being, a regular workout program helps with a lot of things, including gaming hobbies. You don't have to work to become the next WWE star. Instead, I just started with the easier programs from Darebee.
     
  14. Keeshan

    Keeshan Member <Insignia>

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    Weight lifting and archery help me keep a good posture
     
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  15. Infomerc

    Infomerc Grandfathered

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    This is good advice...outside of sports. IN sports, we rarely stand erect (baseball, basketball, football, martial arts, etc). (Archery, OK, erect). In these sports, the ready position is usually a slight crouch, back coiled, head slightly forward, hands up in front. But we don't stay in that position for minutes at a time.

    As the majority of us are PvPers, this is a fight mode, and we get into that mindset with that posture. Pulse, adrenaline, aggression...all elevate. I need my work(play)station to force me out of that posture.

    Conversely, in PvE I'm pretty relaxed...without verbal outbursts and pressing a hole in my keyboard, like in PvP.
     

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